Rohit Kumar's Views

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Militancy In Search of Happiness

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“Today people are exploited like never before, the divide between the haves and have nots is getting wider and wider, there is no recourse to justice and the rulers are completely disconnected from the peoples problems. This is a great tragedy that is forcing the poor to take up arms against the rich.” Raja Mujtaba

In this era of religious fervor and world wide resurgence of faith and beliefs Armies of liberals or so calling themselves enlightened moderates are stuck in loops of massive and mighty groups and factions of fervent believers defending their faith and beliefs through angry demands. Almost everywhere to the world these days word fundamentalism is sounding familiar. Having penetrated, built and strengthened an extensive network at grass root level and from lowest ebb of poverty and slums these militants and radical groups mainly operating under patronage of underworld mafia of death funders and their distributors and dealers of drugs, lethal arms and other endangered inventories. These extremist forces in question are not only known as Muslims but they are all now very well known as groups and factions of Christians, Zion, Hindus and Buddhist fundamentalists and conservatives. The rise of these endangered species around the world is not only because of the wider politicization of religions by corrupt Govts but also because of social and economic injustice, disparity and disorder as an out come of that new world order launched cunningly by richer states to grab grub and divert all resources especially of those nation states which are socially economically and politically weaker but highly enriched with natural resources.

Boom in religious arousals in our region especially after fall of USSR reflect several factors already identified by endless numbers of thinkers and writers. Main factor is the loose and oppressive system of political controls and governance by planted Corrupt and weak Govts especially in socially economically and politically weaker states. Because of social political and economic disparity and extensive gaps of miles and miles between rich and poor even some Buddhists have also adopted a tough minded profile. In so called shinning India the Militancy offers to vast number of low cast Dalits and other untouchables a way out of their country’s highly oppressive cast system. These Cast effective people all shouting out loud in mass conversion ceremonial gatherings “we don’t want to be treated as animals anymore”. Such growing numbers of extremists groups anywhere are now claiming through power of their own muscles to translate into political power like Hindutwa Terror. There is a big trouble therefore emerging not only out of some Muddrissahs but there are even bigger troubles and threats emerging out of some temples, churches, monasteries and even those getting enlightened under the banyan tree. Cleaning that all mess may take time so uncertainly but the proper understanding of the gravity of situation and realistic approach of all those who really matter here there and every where must not take any more time. Present course of continued collision must pick an immediate course of withdrawal and forces with all resources must be diverted and concentrated on immediate change from course of collision to course of cohesion and coherence through civilized means of social and economic justice within and across all societies.

Thereafter fall of USSR and launch of that new world order which unfortunately made the money but not the human values and general well being as the ultimate measure of success for countries and their people.

This approach of money as an ultimate measure of success not only affected to draw a clear divide in societies making rich as richie rich and poor as slum dog as potential terrorist in hands of mafias. High time those who matter either in America or rest of the world must get ready to look into the most unlikely sides of the menace of militancy especially when men like Mr. Joe Bidden standing on soils of this troubled region loudly acknowledge the fact that Military is not the only solution of Militancy.

Now the approach of Economic experts towards Economic Policies of their countries is highly needed to be innovative. Their policy makers and money merchants must now think more about general happiness and wellbeing of their people rather than merely on bullshit of GDP. But can bureaucracies of today especially of countries like Pakistan really be educated to think and measure about Happiness in Economics? As an ordinary citizen having nothing to do with science and technology of economics I am more concerned about my happiness in my own economics rather than about GDP of my country. But throughout our lives all ordinaries like me for our happiness are made to run after that unmatchable untouchable moving target of GDP. That GDP nuisance ever since has intensified poverty, has extended the slums and has generated slum dogs especially in our region. Today there is nothing else in the world that sells like poverty. Unfortunately all programs of poverty alleviation of money merchants and their NGOnised agents are infect poverty glorification programs to even make more money out of slums.

When like morality and empathy are imbibed in our genes so are savagery and blood lust. Those who matter in countries and societies to affect the lives and livelihood of their people must learn what makes their people both noble and terrible. They must also learn to distinct between virtues and vice.

Author Arundhati Roy defends Kashmir statements

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NEW DELHI – Indian author Arundhati Roy, facing possible sedition charges over remarks she made about disputed Indian Kashmir, said on Tuesday she had only been calling for “justice” for the region.


The Booker prize winning Indian author, Arundhathi Roy

Roy’s statement came after police in New Delhi said they were weighing whether to bring sedition charges against the Booker prize-winning author over comments she made about Kashmir in recent days.

The author of the novel “The God of Small Things” issued a statement Tuesday saying her remarks urging “azadi” or freedom for Kashmir were “fundamentally a call for justice.”

The region has been beset by anti-India violence, curfews and strikes since early June, when a 17-year-old student was killed by a police teargas shell. Since then, a total of 111 protesters and bystanders have died.

“What I say comes from love and pride. It comes from not wanting people to be killed, raped, imprisoned or have their fingernails pulled out in order to force them to say they are Indians,” she said in an emailed statement.

Arundhati, who has emerged in recent years as a prominent social activist, has spoken out on two occasions in recent days on Kashmir, in one instance sharing a stage with hardline separatist Kashmiri leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani.

The Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party has objected strongly to Roy’s remarks, calling them “seditious” and accusing the Congress-led government of “looking the other way” by not taking any legal action against Roy.

Law Minister Veerappa Moily said the comments were “most unfortunate”. While there is freedom of speech, “it can’t violate the patriotic sentiments of the people,” Moily said, according to the Press Trust of India.

Nuclear-armed India and Pakistan each hold part of Kashmir but claim it in full. India insists that Kashmir is an “integral part” of the country.

The Himalayan region, which has triggered two wars between the nuclear-armed neighbours, has been wracked by a militant insurgency against Indian rule since 1989.

Rebel violence has declined sharply since the start of a peace process between India and Pakistan.

Roy said in her statement that she had read in Indian newspapers that she might be arrested on charges of sedition for her remarks supporting freedom for Kashmir.

“I said what millions of people here (in Kashmir) say every day. I said what I as well as other commentators have written and said for years,” she said.

“Anybody who cares to read the transcripts of my speeches will see that they were fundamentally a call for justice,” she said.

Geelani also faces the threat of sedition charges for comments he made while sharing the podium with Roy, according to the Indian media.

When told of the possible charges, the elderly separatist leader said 90 such cases had already been filed against him.

“Let this be the 91st,” he declared.

I pity the nation that needs to jail those who ask for justice: Arundhati Roy

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Arundhati Roy

“I write this from Srinagar, Kashmir. This morning’s papers say that I may be arrested on charges of sedition for what I have said at recent public meetings on Kashmir. I said what millions of people here say every day. I said what I, as well as other commentators have written and said for years. Anybody who cares to read the transcripts of my speeches will see that they were fundamentally a call for justice. I spoke about justice for the people of Kashmir who live under one of the most brutal military occupations in the world; for Kashmiri Pandits who live out the tragedy of having been driven out of their homeland; for Dalit soldiers killed in Kashmir whose graves I visited on garbage heaps in their villages in Cuddalore; for the Indian poor who pay the price of this occupation in material ways and who are now learning to live in the terror of what is becoming a police state.

Justice.JPG
Writer-activist Arundhati Roy at Geelani’s convention in Delhi.

Yesterday I traveled to Shopian, the apple-town in South Kashmir which had remained closed for 47 days last year in protest against the brutal rape and murder of Asiya and Nilofer, the young women whose bodies were found in a shallow stream near their homes and whose murderers have still not been brought to justice. I met Shakeel, who is Nilofer’s husband and Asiya’s brother. We sat in a circle of people crazed with grief and anger who had lost hope that they would ever get ‘insaf’-justice-from India, and now believed that Azadi-freedom- was their only hope. I met young stone pelters who had been shot through their eyes. I traveled with a young man who told me how three of his friends, teenagers in Anantnag district, had been taken into custody and had their finger-nails pulled out as punishment for throwing stones.

In the papers some have accused me of giving ‘hate-speeches’, of wanting India to break up. On the contrary, what I say comes from love and pride. It comes from not wanting people to be killed, raped, imprisoned or have their finger-nails pulled out in order to force them to say they are Indians. It comes from wanting to live in a society that is striving to be a just one. Pity the nation that has to silence its writers for speaking their minds. Pity the nation that needs to jail those who ask for justice, while communal killers, mass murderers, corporate scamsters, looters, rapists, and those who prey on the poorest of the poor, roam free.”

LHC CJ takes suo motu notice of rape of seven minors in Daska

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LAHORE: Lahore High Court Chief Justice Khawaja Muhammad Sharif took suo motu notice of the abduction and rape of seven girls and boys in Daska, directing the Sialkot district police officer (DPO) to appear in court in this regard on May 6. The chief justice took the suo motu notice on a news item, saying “The media has flashed the plight of disgruntled minor girls and boys who became victims of rape in Daska during the last one and a half moth. Out of them, two girls have expired, while two others are still fighting for life in two hospitals in Lahore.” The chief justice also directed the Punjab advocate general to appear for assistance in the case. Separately, a private TV channel reported that police have apprehended the rapist in Daska. Police sources disclosed the man had confessed to raping around 76 girls. The name of the man has not been disclosed, the channel said.

Written by rohitkumarsviews

May 5, 2010 at 7:07 am

LHC CJ takes suo motu notice of rape of seven minors in Daska

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LAHORE: Lahore High Court Chief Justice Khawaja Muhammad Sharif took suo motu notice of the abduction and rape of seven girls and boys in Daska, directing the Sialkot district police officer (DPO) to appear in court in this regard on May 6. The chief justice took the suo motu notice on a news item, saying “The media has flashed the plight of disgruntled minor girls and boys who became victims of rape in Daska during the last one and a half moth. Out of them, two girls have expired, while two others are still fighting for life in two hospitals in Lahore.” The chief justice also directed the Punjab advocate general to appear for assistance in the case. Separately, a private TV channel reported that police have apprehended the rapist in Daska. Police sources disclosed the man had confessed to raping around 76 girls. The name of the man has not been disclosed, the channel said.

Written by rohitkumarsviews

May 5, 2010 at 7:07 am

Following the UN report

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By: Zafar Hilaly

In the past, the army has been loath to have senior officers tried. Coups, wars, botched military operations, corruption on a gargantuan scale and the loss of half the country have produced no trials. Officers responsible for such acts have lived on to write their memoirs

Finally, the government seems to have worked up the courage to begin in earnest an investigation into the murder of Benazir Bhutto. It has been a disgracefully long time in coming. Clearly, the UN Commission of Inquiry Report has been instrumental; not only has it imparted the much-needed testosterone and told us where to look for the culprits, as if we did not know, but also framed a charge-sheet of sorts. It has, therefore, served a vital purpose, regardless of what the legion of its critics spout to the contrary.

Justice, which is to give everyone his due, is the one constant and perpetual wish of society. And a lot of people have borne the pain readily only in the hope that justice will be done. Now the government must ensure that some degree of justice must be seen to be done or else electorally it will perish. And Mr Zardari will never be able to wash off the stain.

Mr Zardari seems to appreciate this and is readying himself to do that. He has said that 90 percent of those involved have been apprehended. What he probably means is that the actual perpetrators, the young men, have been identified, some apprehended and some on the run. No doubt detailed confessions will soon see the light of day. The UN report also confidently identifies a teenager as the suicide bomber and, speaking in Peshawar recently, Mr Zardari also hinted that he might be an Afghan.

But what of those who conceived the crime? The chances are, nay the certainty is, that they have not been identified. And if the crime is to be pegged exclusively on the Taliban, on the supposition that as the perpetrators are the Taliban then so must be their minders and their leader, it would not wash with the public. Pakistanis tend to perceive the donkey standing behind bars as a zebra. And it is not their fault. In countries where the system of government can be described as absolutism moderated by murder, suspicion, and not the truth, reigns supreme.

However, so many are the theories in circulation and so far fetched are some that no justice system can address them all, and hence we may happen to settle for the most plausible answer as the true one. And while that sounds pretty boring, let us accept it for a moment and agree to lay the blame for her murder at the door of the Taliban, although few are willing to do so.

But struggling to find out who killed BB is only half, precisely half, the battle. Of no less importance is who left the door open so that the murderers could saunter in and plant their bombs in Karachi, and do what they did at Liaquat Bagh with such impunity. In a sense, they are the real culprits. And if Saud Aziz conveniently takes the rap for ordering the crime site to be hosed down, as he is most likely to, for reasons of ‘crowd control’, then the whole case will appear neatly resolved for some, but it will not suffice for the rest of the country. By next week, therefore, when the small investigation group set up to question him and the former MI chief end their time-bound investigation, we will know where this case is headed.

Of course, the cynics among us say that they know it already. Without proof of a conspiracy, which is something very difficult to prove in court, and impossible to do without all the culprits being in custody, the guilty will go scot-free. So Mr Zardari, if he is to do the job thoroughly, must ensure that all those suspected of being involved are made available to the investigators. And here, of course, he runs up against a big obstacle. Of those who stood to benefit by her removal are/were senior military officers, including the one who is abroad. Roping them in would require a fundamental shift in the way the Pakistani establishment works. But what may prove a greater hurdle is not the courts or foreign governments, but our sad history.

Accountability is a relatively novel concept in Pakistan. It is irksome, messy and disquieting, but necessary nonetheless. But who can say with certainty that the penny has dropped? In the past, the army has been loath to have senior officers tried. Coups, wars, botched military operations, corruption on a gargantuan scale and the loss of half the country have produced no trials. Officers responsible for such acts have lived on to write their memoirs. Some defeated and disgraced generals have even tried to form political parties. Why, then, should the latest crop of officers, who could face charges of conspiracy to murder or criminal negligence, not also go scot-free? Sadly, whereas even colonial rulers made their generals like Clive and Hastings answerable to parliament and the courts, ours have not, to date.

The question is, will this paradigm continue? And almost everyone says that it may, because Mr Zardari does not possess the guts and the gumption to attempt to change it; nor does he have the wherewithal in terms of political support. And, solid and honest as he is by repute, General Kayani may not feel that now is the moment to undertake a revolution in the army’s approach towards errant officers. By making the former DG Military Intelligence, a serving general, available to questioning by civilians is, they say, already a big step. Doing more may prove unsettling.

Of course, such a stance, if indeed it is an accurate depiction of the current thinking, cannot stand if the evidence unearthed suggests the culpability of others. The public will not tolerate it. Nor will parliament. And nor, my gut instinct tells me, will Kayani. And, at the risk of being shouted down, I may add, nor will Mr Zardari. When the time comes to stand and be counted, he will. She stood up, and so will he.

Mr Zardari must now constitute an enquiry panel headed by a Supreme Court judge to investigate the murder based on the 18 recommendations contained in the summary of the UN report. If he prevaricates, he will perish.

The writer is a former ambassador. He can be reached at charles123it@hotmail.com

Oligarchy With An Indian Flavour

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By Jagdish Keshav

Is India heading towards Oligarchy or is it already being ruled by one?

This is the question placed in front of us, for those who are getting to be aware of goings on in front of us and behind us.

What I mean by Oligarchy is that in the name of democracy, are we being hoodwinked by a caucus represented by vested interests namely big corporations?

We have a Home Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram who in his past was a corporate lawyer who represented companies like Enron and Vedanta in their heydays or dark days, depending on how we see it.

As a lawyer for the infamous Vedanta who by their controversial presence in the tribal areas of Orissa, he defended their Bauxite mining operations in this highly environmentally sensitive region where fauna, flora and the existence of tribals have been threatened. The plight of the tribals who are losing the lands where they have resided for centuries did realize that the man who represents the corporations is deaf to their pleas and blind to their sufferings.

These big corporations are siphoning off huge profits from the ore business while India is receiving a pittance of an amount from the export & processing of these ores.
More important is the very existence of the tribals thanks to the mining operations.

The bluff of these conglomerates is there for us to see but the media and the persons defending it have made certain that in the name of democracy & free trade, these unethical practices go unnoticed. This is the danger for a country which just recently got out from the clutches of another oligarchy, the colonial type.

It is understandable the reason for his stand from where P Chidambaram comes from. He studied corporate law in the US and not surprisingly his support goes where the money is.

Socio-economics and law & order are two separate things that are plaguing the countryside in India and they need to be handled separately. The reason for the explosion in violence in the tribal tracts of India is primarily is of socio-economic in character and not necessarily just a law & order situation as per the ex-corporate lawyer turned politician emphasizes.

The Maoist violence which has gripped the so-called Red-Corridor is a result of decades long deprivation, neglect & exploitation by these conglomerates & individuals. The sufferings & tribulations of the rural poor & the tribals which have stretched for such long periods have failed to stretch the minds of the ruling classes towards their plight. A violence by either party, whether the Maoists or the establishment has to end.

Needless to say, the violence that has exploded in this corridor has set a dangerous trend that can result in an uncontrolled response by the establishment where the tribals & the other rural poor may experience further deterioration of their living standards. A living standard that consists of lack proper healthcare, sanitation, access to education & widespread malnutrition amongst these children whom it seems, even Gods have neglected. That their turmoil which has gone unnoticed and uncared for over the decades by the general media owned by the corporates may witness further ignorance.

A question that arises now is that whether these oligarchies should be given an unabated run to rule and be protected by the government or in the true sense of democracy, should these mining & other companies must be nationalized to provide true benefits to these masses of people who have not yet seen justice they deserve?